Coffee House: A Review

By Sapna Humar

Last Wednesday, Forest Hill’s music department hosted its second coffee house of the year, and it was a great success! For those of you who don’t know, FHCI’s coffee house is a gathering of students where anyone can perform and showcase their musical talents, whether it be singing a song or strumming a tune on the guitar. 

This was the second time coffee house was held in the music room, and the atmosphere was one of the defining characteristics of the night. The dim lighting, numerous lamps, and yoga mats on the ground really set the mood, and made for a relaxed environment where performers and the audience could feel comfortable.

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To top it off, free food was offered as well! During intermission, a wide variety of snacks were given to both the audience and the performers, and this really solidified people’s enjoyment of the event.

Overall, it was a great night, with a supportive audience and extremely talented performers. However, if even more people had come to cheer on their friends, or just to simply hang out, the event would be that much better. Coming to coffee house, even for a few minutes, would have instantly brightened your day and would have made for a great place to just relax and relieve your stress. The next coffee house, which will be held this November, will no doubt prove to be even better than this year’s!

A sincere congratulations goes out to all performers, and a special thank you to all those who organized the event!

FHCI Students “Saddened​” By​ Holocaust Announcement Assembly​

On Friday Morning, instead of the regular Holocaust Assembly on Yom HaShoah, Forest Hill Collegiate Insitute changed it up and had a 15-minute assembly on the announcements during the second period. Jewish Culture Club members discussed the tragedy that was the Holocaust and honoured the approximately six million Jews and five million others who perished in the Holocaust as a result of the operations by Nazi Germany and its collaborators.

The assembly was broadcast across all classrooms in the school and discussed the importance of hearing about the Holocaust, the horrendous nature of genocides and listened to beautiful prayers for peace. Students were encouraged to turn off their phones and direct all their attention to the assembly. The announcement also talked about the recent anti-Semitic graffiti that was found on a student poster at Northern Secondary School.

Although many teachers and students believed that the assembly was a positive change, others had very different opinions. Grade 11 Student, Bailee Cohen, says that her “entire class had a debate” and felt like the assembly was “lazy” and “disrespectful”. Cohen also noted that the school has long assemblies in the auditorium for Prom but lack assemblies for “important days”, such as Pink Day. Her English class wrote a letter to the administration with her teacher that expressed their feelings for the assembly, according to Cohen.

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Other students shared similar opinions with Cohen. Noa Wolfe, a student in Bailee’s English class, says “the announcement played at my school this morning was a cop-out for the Holocaust assembly that Forest Hill has put on for years.”

I believe the millions of people who died during this time deserve more than a 10-minute speech over the intercom.

Wolfe says that she looks forward to the assembly every year. “It is an opportunity for me to learn more about this issue in an engaging and creative way. However, this year the assembly was cancelled and a quick announcement was put in its place.” She thinks that the regular assembly should not have been cancelled, “especially because of the large Jewish community Forest Hill has.” She adds that “we as a school should have given the very few survivors left the respected that they deserve.”

Marlee Moskoff, a grade 11 student at Forest Hill Collegiate Insitute, says that “the announcements were not nearly as effective as an assembly would’ve been. Assemblies have visual and audio components which are more engaging for students.” She noted many flaws with the new assembly, such as the fact that students tend to tune out for announcements. “The message of the Holocaust is important enough to take students out of class to better communicate the message.”

This is an extremely important message to me because my family was targeted in the Holocaust and I want there to be as much awareness as possible.

After the assembly, classes were invited to come to the foyer to sign a poster for “upstanding,” which was discussed in detail during the announcement. Upstanding is defined as an “honest” and “respectable” member of the community.

 

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Students on the March of the Living (2018)

 

A grade 12 student, who requested to stay anonymous, had this to say:

 I will agree that being an upstander is important but I am unimpressed that more time was spent on discussing the addition of this word to the dictionary than was spent honouring and remembering the Holocaust.

Eight students, initially driven by grade 12 student Jalen Manett, wrote a formal email to the administration about the importance of having a “real” assembly. They write:

“…Yom HaShoah is a day that hits close to home for many students at our school, a school with an above average Jewish student population, as for many it is a day to remember personal connections to the Holocaust through family members who perished or were affected by this tragic event. Many of us were even lucky enough to have had the unforgettable opportunity to march through the death camps in Poland and hear first-hand recollections of the heart-breaking stories of those who survived this tragedy. That is why myself and countless other students, both Jewish and not, were particularly upset by the decision to condense this year’s remembrance assembly into an eight-minute announcement. During which time my classmates who do not understand the significance of the Holocaust went on their phones, completed their homework, and took nothing away from this presentation.

The main reason why myself and many others were so concerned by this is this gradual shortening of our initiatives to commemorate the Holocaust just goes to enforce the naysayers and Holocaust deniers who base their claims on a lack of information and knowledge, which we as a school are enforcing by neglecting to educate students properly on this important piece of history. Especially in light of the recent actions at Northern Secondary School I know the Jewish community at FHCI saw an increased importance in this year’s Yom HaShoah initiatives. I hope you will take our concerns into consideration as we only want to celebrate our history in a positive way with the rest of the Forest Hill community.”

 


The views reflected in the article do not necessarily illustrate the opinions associated with The Golden Falcon newspaper.

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The Autonomous Hour

        After spending an intense six weeks working on the most complex robot Forest Hill has ever seen, it was finally time for our robotics competition at York University. This year’s robot was equipped with a pneumatic (pressurized air-based) intake system and conveyor belt to play in the FIRST robotics competition. Our game strategy was to be a quick, nimble, low-profile robot that could perform its task with consistency and efficiency.

        As we passed inspection and tested our primary mechanisms, we knew it was time for our first match. It began with an unfortunate start, as our robot’s pre-written code did not execute as intended in the autonomous phase of the game. Nevertheless, with a bit of luck, we managed to get through this portion of the match unscathed. When the tele-op phase of the match began, our driver rushed to grab the Xbox controller to manually command our robot to pick up cubes and put them in the necessary locations. The first couple of cubes were successfully placed without much difficulty, but after those, we found ourselves unable able to pick them up anymore. From the driver’s station, we could not tell what was wrong with the robot. We kept trying to pick up cubes and failed each and every time. We lost our first match by a substantial margin, but this was not of much importance compared to the fact that a piece of metal on the robot’s intake was bent. Quickly rushing back to our pit, we replaced the warped gusset plate and reinforced it with another one. With this out the way, we felt more confident that our performance would improve.

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At the competition

 

        The following match began somewhat innocently; the robot’s code was still error-filled, but we came close to figuring out the root of the issue. Everything was going decently until our robot smashed into one of the field elements, ripping the entire intake mechanism off of the robot. As I saw the robot’s arm dragging across the field, I thought the damage would be irreparable. After the match, we bolted onto the field hoping to fix the robot as quickly as humanly possible – only to find out that our next match was in ten minutes. It was humiliating. Without an intake mechanism on the robot, there was little we could do to contribute. A few frustrating games without an intake system later, we finally had the chance to reattach the robot’s arm to be able to play the game as intended. Learning our lesson, we secured the robot’s intake system with a combination of bolts and rivets. We also pinpointed the issue with our autonomous code and corrected it.

        It was an incredible feeling for us to be able to play matches without technical issues. Our autonomous code did exactly what we needed it to and we finally got the chance to play our own game rather than one dictated by our more experienced alliance partners. We got to show all of the other teams at the York that team 5699, the Robo Sapiens, came to compete.

Despite all of these setbacks, this experience was anything but a failure. We built a robot that could accomplish what we intended it to, had the opportunity to express our creativity a medium that unlike any other, fundraised thousands of dollars, worked alongside professional engineers, and most importantly went from a group of nerd building robots in a biology room to a family. And, of course, we worked with what are unquestionably the most dedicated teachers in the school. They sacrificed enormous amounts of time away from their families so we could undertake this daunting – and incredible – project. I would like to extend the sincerest thanks to our lead mentors, Mr Kleiman and Mrs Wilk. In the most literal sense, this would not have been possible without their work on the robot and behind the scenes to get us to the competition. I will look back upon robotics as the single most important activity I could have taken part in during my high school career. At the end of the day, we didn’t just build a robot, we built character.

How the LEAP Club is “Making FHCI Green Again”

By Julia Funk, Aribah Khan and Eriselda Lleshi

This year LEAP club has been focusing a lot on waste. You may have noticed our posters on the wall during Canada’s Waste Reduction Week, or even bought a yummy grilled cheese sandwich for our fundraiser. Waste comes in all shapes and forms. What we need from you, is to become more aware of it. Keep reading to find out more about three very big forms of waste; food, textile, and electronic waste.

Food waste is becoming an increasingly big problem.  There is over $680 billion in food wasted every year but even so, there are 795 million undernourished people worldwide… less than one-quarter of all wasted food is enough to feed them ALL. Not to mention that food waste is also water waste (due to growing, production etc.) and with water pollution rapidly depleting our oceans, we don’t need to waste a single drop more. The only way things will get better is if we each do our part. You can start off by making sure you only buy what you need and checking your fridge every few days to make sure nothing is going bad before you get to eat it. A handy tip is to keep a “Eat First” Bin in your fridge. Even if something does go bad, don’t throw it out. I repeat do not throw it out! There are thousands of decomposers drooling over those scraps –so be a good citizen and feed some of your local earth worms. In return, we get fresh compost which can be used to grow more food. For more information and live counts on food waste check out : http://www.theworldcounts.com/counters/world_food_consumption_statistics/world_food_waste_statistics.

Textile waste is one of the least spoken about forms of waste, yet it has an immense impact on our environment. Textile waste is a material that is deemed unusable for its original purpose by the owner. In North America, over 9.5 million tons of clothing are sent to landfills every year even though 95% of these clothes could be reused or recycled. In Canada alone, we produce enough textile waste a year to make a mountain three times the size of the Rogers Centre! In today’s consumerist society we do not realize that we have increased our clothing consumption from 50 billion new garments in 2000, to over 100 billion in 2017. This huge production of clothes is using 1/3 of the world’s fresh water resources. So what can you do to help reduce the impact of your clothes? The options are endless; reuse them, give to homeless shelters, donate them to second hand stores like the Value Village, or even give them to big retail stores who recycle them! Visit http://citywasteservices.ca/2016/12/15/the-essential-guide-to-clothes-donation-and-recycling-in-toronto/ to check out more on what to do with your unwanted clothes.

E-waste is an informal term to describe the consumer and business electronics which are nearing or at the end of their useful life. This applies to any electronics such as your cellphones, laptops, tablets, and etc. A staggering 20 to 50 million metric tons of electronic waste is generated worldwide every year, but only 11.4% of it is recycled. When electronics end up in landfills the toxins they contain such as mercury, lead, and cadmium contaminate our soil and water. Recycling these electronics instead will allow valuable resources to be reused as well as decrease their harmful effects on the environment. The amount of E- waste can be minimized through the mantra of “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.” Firstly, reducing the e-waste can be done through good maintenance of your electronics and careful decision making when first buying the electronics. Our functioning electronics can also be reused by donating them or selling them. Also, even if a product cannot be repaired, it can be recycled. There are many organizations that manage e-waste recycling such as EMCO disposal services, Recycling council of Ontario, and Greentronics computer recycling. You can make a difference and make our world a greener place by decreasing the use of these hazardous e-waste products. If you believe that your electronic is “trash,” do not throw it in in the trash! Bring it to any home hardware store, a drop-off Depot or even our schools very own Electronic Waste Bin found in the main office. Click the following link to find out more locations and more facts about our electronic waste:  https://www.recyclemyelectronics.ca/on/where-can-i-recycle

These are only three forms of waste but there are many more. We hope you will all become more mindful of your consumption and the impact of the waste you create. There is always a right way to dispose of items and we hope that you will choose the greener option. Your contributions to making the world a greener place are more significant than you think. As we work towards our goals one step at a time, keep in mind, it all starts with YOU!

Look forward to more articles by the LEAP Club to help “Make Forest Hill GREEN Again”

Semi-Formal, You Asked For It.

By Sapna Humar, Matthew Lindzon and Esther Eisen

Complaining may be the norm for Forest Hill students. Our school is now known as an academically inclined and non-spirited environment. This Semi-Formal seemed like a test: could FHCI students finally rise to the task and find their spirit and pride? The short answer: sort of. Almost all students at FHCI have been so used to being upset about the lack of school spirit and excitement. However, only 15% of students purchased a ticket to the Semi-Formal dance.

Only 15% of students purchased a ticket to the Semi-Formal dance.

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When February 15th came, I, along with most others, had some doubts, but we all came out of it feeling like it had been more-or-less successful. Generally, the overall opinion I got from most people who attended the dance was that it went better than they had expected. The venue was small, but it was enjoyable and didn’t feel cramped in the slightest. The decorations added ambience, and the DJ provided us with some great music. There were refreshments and snacks offered, as well as a photo booth, which I thought was one of the main highlights. My favourite part of the night though was the general vibe and atmosphere of the place — everyone was dancing and having a good time, and I feel like it was the first time in a long while where people were actually proud to be a part of this school and contribute to its identity. All of this, as well as the music and venue, served to make for a great evening.

Naturally, there were some things that could have been improved. For instance, although there were drinks and some snacks offered, there could have been more food provided. There was little to complain about other than that, but of course, the one major problem was the smaller number of attendees in comparison to the entire population of the school. It was already an overall great experience, but if more people had bought tickets and come, it would have been even better. Despite the constant complaining of FHCI not having any dances or events, once one did finally come along, people were reluctant to buy tickets. I don’t know if that was because of the venue, the cost, or the lack of school spirit, but I do know that this dance set an example for the years to come. Hopefully, others will be encouraged to buy tickets for future events, to not only have a good time, but to support our school as well!

In the past, Forest Hill has had some problems with school spirit and with making the place feel welcoming and exciting. This dance, which has paved the way for many more dances to come, was a huge step forward in skyrocketing our school spirit and improving the sense of identity shared by Forest Hill students. Thirty-five dollars may seem like a lot, however, in the grand scheme of things, an experience like a Semi-Formal in high school is priceless.

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Students at the Semi-Formal dance downtown on February 15th

The question I kept asking myself was whether students were not buying tickets in the first place based on the idea that they did not want to go to the event, or was it that students genuinely enjoy complaining about school events. For the last decade or so, students have been accustomed to complaining about the lack of school spirit in our school. A possible reason why tickets sales were not amazing could have been that students get satisfaction from finding small problems from events, more than having a spirited event itself.


Here are the stats for the event:

The number of students who attended: approx. 150

Most students attending were in grade 10, then grade 12, then grade 11 and the least number of students were in grade 9.


To sum it up, I think the semi-formal was both successful and necessary. Yes, there were not as many students as there could have been, but this only proves that Forest Hill was able to pull it off, even with a limited number of students.  Of course, a huge thank you goes out to the members of Student Council, as well as all of the staff who helped organize and supervise the event. These people, and all those who bought tickets and supported the dance, were what made it possible, and what helped set a strong precedent for Forest Hill’s bright future.

Students who did not attend the event probably are happy they did not ‘lose’ $35. The people who went to the dance likely are happy that they gained a great experience. When I am 50 years old, and I am looking through my Yearbook from high school, I hope I will feel joy remembering the great time I had with my friends at this event.

Maybe once students see that others had a great time at this dance, they will realize that they can ignore the small imperfections of this night and just have a good time. So what if they did not have food? Eat before the dance! The Semi-Formal was not about experiencing a perfect night; it was about having pride in our school and coming together as a community.

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Farewell 2017

By Linda Cako

2017 was supposed to be the year we were going to see change. And change we saw. Not all was good, like President Trump’s Muslim Ban, North Korea starting to flex its emerging nuclear prowess, and the UN warning us that we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since WWII with up to 20 million people being at risk of starvation in Yemen, Somalia, South Sudan, and Nigeria. There were three powerful hurricanes to hit consecutively, and France ended its State of Emergency after two years of attacks and will start having a more intense police presence throughout the country instead.

Clearly, it was not the best year for global issues.

Some changes and events, however, were good and celebrated throughout the world, such as Australia passing it’s Same-Sex Marriage Bill. The first gene therapy treatment for cancer, Kymriah, was FDA approved in August and has already begun to be used on patients with leukaemia and is being considered a miracle cure, and Google’s DeepMind AI taught itself to walk.

It was a time of great change in Forest Hill as well. We changed school principles, had our very first dance, and said goodbye to great teachers and hello to new and old faces.

While it seems that every year we want to label as The Worst Year Ever, 2017 was hardly the worst year. Scientific discoveries gave us hope for the future and made us realize how far we have come as a species, and emerging politics made us understand how far we have yet to go to achieve our goals of becoming a more fair and just society.

Going into 2018, it’s time to reflect how we want to proceed. What pressing issues must we address? What issues have inspired us to make a change? What do we have left to work on? Even as a high schooler, we can all make an impact. All it takes is to find your passion and advocate for change. It does not have to be enormous. Small steps eventually lead to great distances being crossed so it’s never too late to start.

Ms. Fuentes’ said in her first speech when she came to Forest Hill that she wants us all to take advantage of our unique positions to make a difference in the school. How do we want to leave Forest Hill? Better than when we entered it, for sure. Whatever the definition of better is to you, take 2017’s lessons and make something good come out of change.


Linda is a grade 12 student at FHCI and is a Social Issues Editor for The Golden Falcon newspaper.

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Semi-Formal Tickets Go On Sale This Week

By Matt Lindzon

Forest Hill’s Student Council has been working for months in preparation for FHCI’s first ever Semi-Formal. The event, taking place at the beautiful 2nd Floor Events, is $35 and will be sold in the cafeteria every day this week at lunch. There are only a limited number of tickets, so don’t miss out!

If you are interested in going, make sure you bring your signed safety agreement that was emailed to your parents.

Humberside vs Forest Hill: Game Analysis

Hockey / Brian Stauffer

By Jake Greenberg

On Tuesday, November 29th, the Forest Hill Falcons Varsity Hockey Team kicked off their season against Humberside Colligate. After 13 years of coaching the hockey team, Head Coach Mr Ketchum had never beaten this school in a game. When the game was all said and done, this streak was finally put to rest. The boys came through for their coach and took home a 2-1 win to start their season with a bang.

The Falcons started off slowly, losing the opening faceoff and playing in their own end for the majority of the first five minutes. Some may think that this would tire out the team — physically and mentally — but the Falcons kept pushing. Once the puck was finally being consistently controlled in Humberside’s defensive end of the ice, chances upon chances were being continuously generated for the Falcons. With 3 minutes left, the puck landed on the stick of the Falcon’s older Mierczuk brother, Axel, who wound up and fired a shot to the top left corner of the net. Opening the season’s scoring, and showing Humberside that no matter how hard the Falcons get down, they will always fight back and end up on top.

Once the second period began, the game only got more aggressive. Big hits coming from both sides seemed to be the theme of the game. With the Falcons falling victim to some bad penalty calls, Humber Side had Many opportunities to come back and tie the game. With power play after power play, Humberside could not turn chances into goals, mostly due to the outstanding play of Elliot Zolf in net. During a small window on five on five hockey, the determined Falcons scored again, with Dylan Katz tipping another strong outside shot from Axel Mierczuk.

In the third period, the Falcons were determined to keep Zolf’s shutout alive, but Humberside had other plans. They won the period’s opening faceoff and just like the start of the game, dominated the Falcons in their defensive end; only this time, finding the back of the net of a big Wrist shot from the hash marks, cutting the lead in half. Throughout the period Forest Hill and Humberside were battling back and forth, but the goaltending on both ends of the ice was too good for both opposing offensive units, Humberside’s goalie controlling all rebound and Zolf coming in clutch stopping both a breakaway and a penalty shot.

The final buzzer went off and the Falcons went home feeling accomplished. This game was a very good example of how hard work will bring people to victory and allow them to come out on top. The Falcons season is just the beginning and anything can happen in any given game, but hopefully winning can be a common factor for each of the rest of their games.

Student Organization Profile: Music Directorate

By Vanessa Ifepe

Music Directorate is made up of music students whose goal is to spread the sound of school spirit around the school. They are responsible for planning events such as Coffee House where students of all kind are invited to showcase their talents or come and support the performers. They also help to set up concerts such as Sounds of Spring and Chamber Night. Music Directorate hopes to encourage students who are not taking music academically to integrate into the music department. This club wants to show others that this part of the school isn’t exclusive to just music students. Just because you aren’t taking music this year, it doesn’t mean you can’t show off your musical talents or anything else you may be able to contribute! Throughout the school year, Music Directorate meets to discuss new ways to ensure that your year ends on a good note.

FHCI’s Best Dressed: Halloween Edition

By Befftwo Ali

On this spooky holiday, Forest Hill was filled with spirit! Here are some of the highlights:

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The magical Ms Jephcott dressed as a Hogwarts student from the iconic Harry Potter franchise.

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Jori, Paige and Izabel dressed up as middle school slumber party girls, and we’re here for it.[restrict]

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Probably one of the most terrifying costume yet (minus Winnie) so far. Amelia, Sage, Tianna, Krystael, Rebekah and Trisha all posed up as the cast from the Purge.

 

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Ms Newman looked aesthetically pleasing today with her pop art makeup inspired by Roy Litchenstein.

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We also have the lovely Ms. Burnip dressed as one of the monsters from Where the Wild Things Are.

 

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Last, but certainly not least, we have Evelyn dressed up as our former principal, Peggy Aitchison.

 


To view more costumes, browse through the FHCI Photo Stream. Have a spooky Halloween falcons!

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The Complete FHCI Club List 2017/18

A Shot at Life

L. Burnip

Afro-Carib Club

K. Berger

Albanian Culture Club

A. Moore

Art Club

S. Conley

Book Club

D. Haines

Business of Sports Club

E. Ketchum

Champions of Change

D. Cabral

Chess Club

C. Geomolean

Christian Fellowship Club

M. Thompson

Comedy Club

M. Roca

Community Transit Committee

S. MacDonald

Computer Science

A. Costin

Cookies 4 a Cure

E. Monaghan

Cookies for a Cure

R. Jackson

COPE Council

J. Ng

Dance Fashion Show

J. Homatidis/H. Russell

Debate Club

K. Berger

DECA Club

A. Costin

Drama Club

M. Roca

Envirommental Awareness

C. Soneriu

Falcons Cheer Squad

K. Brown

Filipino Club

J. Ibe

Film Critics Club

M. Roca

Football Analytics Club

K. Berger

Gender Sexuality Alliance

A. Chan

The Golden Falcon Newspaper (Student Organization)

E. Lee

Jewish Culture Club

M. Sable

Latino Club

D. Cabral

Law Club

M. Sable

Math Club

A. Basheer

Miracle Club for SickKids

L. Moore

Newcomer’s Club

H. Israelovitch

Politics & History Club

T. Rudan

Save the Animals

R. Jackson

Science Club

J. Pupovac

Sign Language Club

A. Strasberg

Social Action Club

D. Kleiman

Sports Management Club

L. Barber

Student Inclusion Program

K. Berger

TED Club

K. Berger

Video Game Club

D. Ferroni

Did Anyone Really Expect This from FHCI?

By Ethan Blummberg

  The pep rally curated by Forest Hill students this past week was the most triumphant spectacle I have witnessed during my tenure at the school. The event was willingly enjoyed by hundreds of students, discrediting the notion that Forest Hill has no spirit. The event that unfolded in the gymnasium was unlike anything I had ever seen at Forest Hill. The disparity between this rally and previous attempts at school-wide events may be in large part to why it was such a success. As a student of three years, the change was refreshing.

The event was willingly enjoyed by hundreds of students, discrediting the notion that Forest Hill has no spirit.

                A highlight for my self-was the unorthodox methods such as the relay races, the hockey video and Kahoot game that was all used to appeal to the audience of nearly 1000 people. The well-executed video, made by grade 12 student Cole Chypyha, was a captivating insight into this year’s boys varsity hockey team. The visual component was a nice touch to the already stellar line up put together by the powers at be.  The commotion in the middle of the gym caused by the relay races was an outstanding example of the creativity we have in our school. Students from around the school participated in these clever races as their peers enthusiastically watched on. This element of the school-wide event brought a lot of comedic value out of the mishaps classmates endured attempting the relay challenges. All of the different parts of the rally, from the beginning to the end were integral to its success and I wouldn’t have changed a single thing.

                It is nice to finally have someone at Forest Hill who is able to entertain the entire school body, while still clearly articulating the points he must make. This can be found in current school president, James Michael Kabitsis. This captivating speaker led off the fourth period with a great speech that was a catalyst for the rest of the day’s success.  I don’t think it would be too far off for me to say that many of the staff in the school could benefit from listening to one of his speeches; so when the time comes that they must speak in front of the whole school they can properly engage the audience and convey their message. Rather than deliver a boring talk to hundreds of students that have endured many speeches alike.

After seeing Friday’s events unfold it is really hard to determine whether the lack of spirit in the school should be blamed on the students or the staff members of Forest Hill Collegiate Institute.

                I believe the recent rally was a huge success amongst the students, largely in part to how different the event was to what we have been accustomed to at FHCI.  Credit must go to the people who took part in planning the whole ordeal for hosting an event many, including myself, wouldn’t see possible coming from Forest Hill. Nevertheless, I think that this remarkable feat for the students of the school sadly will not occur again in my lifetime at Forest Hill. After seeing Friday’s events unfold it is really hard to determine whether the lack of spirit in the school should be blamed on the students or the staff members of Forest Hill Collegiate Institute.


This story was written by Ethan Blummberg, a Social Issues Editor for The Golden Falcon. The opinions expressed in this article reflect the opinions of the author.

The Terry Fox Run: A Tradition Worth Continuing

By Josh Blatt

Social Issues Head Editor

Every year, the students of Forest Hill walk, run, and donate money in honour of the great Canadian Terry Fox. Terry Fox, despite losing one of his legs to cancer, decided to run across Canada in order to raise money to cure the complex sickness he faced. In total, over $750 million dollars have been raised in the humanitarian’s name. This event not only collects money for the paramount issue of cancer research, but gives students and staff the opportunity to take a break from their busy schedules to get active and celebrate a truly inspiring man. Terry Fox is a person who will be remembered for his determination and selflessness and Forest Hill plans to continue celebrating his work and raising money in his name for a very long time.

Exclusive: Spirit Week Events Announced

Spirit Week is next week!

Here is everything The Golden Falcon knows about Spirit Week:

Monday, September 25th

Club Fair at lunch in the courtyard

Tuesday, September 26th

Athletic Council Activity (to be determined)

Wednesday, September 27th

Music Directorate Activity (to be determined)

Tropical Day

Thursday, September 28th

Terry Fox Run in the morning

Student council Activity at lunch in the foyer

Blue and Gold Day

Friday, September 29th

Pep Rally

Orange Day